Lensbaby Composer: A Selective Focus SLR Camera Lens (pt 1)

A Three Part Series Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Pt. 1 of 3:  Be My Lens, Baby!

Soon after receiving my first 35mm camera, I found that photography was a little more difficult than it had first looked. Ok, it was a lot more difficult. After mastering the learning curve on how make a sharp, well-exposed photo, I saw some photography by David Hamilton and Robert Farber. I was back to square one. Suddenly, I wanted to shoot soft focus images. But, how to do it?

Shortly after graduating college, I got my first dedicated soft focus lens. I had tried all different ways of getting that beautiful soft focus look… shooting through cigarette package cellophane, smearing petroleum jelly on the filter, shooting through other materials like hose, netting, window screen, almost anything you can think of. Then came the Sima soft focus lens… 100mm at f/2 wide open, a simple single lens plastic element, push and pull focusing, it made beautiful images. It worked great… as long as you had your subject perfectly centered. The lens was sharper in the center than at the edges, so if you put your subject off center it would suffer degradation beyond the intent of soft focus. You could manipulate it slightly with an f/4 and an f/5.6 disk, plus there was a neutral density disk in the box that I never really used. The other limitation I immediately realized was the focal length; it was too long to use for most landscape situations. I moved on and tried other specialty lenses, mostly with less success than the Sima.

Then something wonderful happened… a guy like me who liked soft focus made a lens with an integral hard rubber-ish bellows to focus and bend all over the place to skew the plane of focus. Let me be clear – I experimented but never really built anything. I was content to use what others had made before me. Not so for photographer Craig Strong. He too had been unhappy with the soft focus options available to him, so he decided to do something about it, and the first Lensbaby was born. That was 2004; I found it in 2005 at PhotoExpo in New York City… when I saw the booth I went in and bought a Lensbaby 2.0.

The Lensbaby 2.0 creates beautiful images, but it has limitations for me. First, if I wanted to shoot a bracketed exposure, sometimes I found it difficult to hold the lens exactly on the focus point with the skew for a 3 or 5 shot bracket. I also had some difficulty focusing and bending the lens exactly the right way to throw the focus off a certain way. Using it on a tripod gave similar results. Forget trying to do a perfect long bracket for rendering an HDR scene… the original and version 2.0 Lensbabies were great for quick, on the move photography, but not for more studied compositions.

Jump forward to 2008. Apparently nobody mentioned to Craig Strong that he had created a great product and that he should rest on his laurels. He continued to improve the Lensbaby design, and introduced the new Lensbaby Composer. Instead of a bellows, it has a rotating ball-n-socket joint. Focus is achieved in a much more conventional fashion (to us old-school folks who were already used to focusing the lens themselves) with a rotating collar that moves the element assembly closer or farther from the sensor plane. But lo and behold, this wasn't just an improvement on a single lens... the Lensbaby Composer had crossed over to... the system side. I remember one of the early literature pieces I saw from Nikon - it was titled the "Nikon System". Need a right angle viewer that magnifies? Got it. How about a high-point action/sports finder? Ditto. Motor drive with 250-exposure cassette (yeah, film was somewhat precious, but what was really precious was time... like the time spent reloading your camera while the shot gets away). They can do that. Not to mention little things like the Noct Nikkor (look it up if you don't know).

The Lensbaby and Lensbaby 2.0 had some attachments, but weren't what I would call a system. The Lensbaby Optic Swap System is the heart of a new system of lenses that cover the spectrum of soft focus possibilities. Start with the sharpest, a double element glass lens. Second, a single glass element, followed by a single plastic element (if you have experience with a Diana or Holga, you'll know this look). Apertures... we have apertures! Wide open the Composer is pretty soft with any of the lens optics. In the compact storage case/aperture tool housing (Lensbaby calls this the "Magnetic Aperture Set" and is included in with your first Lensbaby), you will find apertures from f/2.8 to f/22. If you are looking for f/4 in there, it is probably already in the lens. Finally, there is a fourth (and fifth?) element that thoughtfully combines a pinhole and zone plate in one housing. But wait... there's more! All of these lens elements fit neatly into the newly redesigned Lensbaby Muse (replacing the Lensbaby original and 2.0 lenses), Control Freak (if precision soft focus, which seems something of an oxymoron, is your gig, this is the lens for you), and the Composer.

Ok, let's do our math now. 5 lens types (double glass, single glass, plastic, zone plate and pinhole), 9 possible apertures including those in the creative aperture kit (without making your own), wide angle and telephoto converters, macro close-up kit... Without creating your own apertures from the blanks in the creative kit, there are well over one hundred different possible system configurations. Of course, you can also get there 3 different ways - the Muse, Composer or Control Freak. For those artsy readers that aren't system oriented, don't be alarmed... on the Lensbaby website you can preview the effects of many of the combinations... just browse to  http://www.Lensbaby.com/optic-comparison.php and use your mouse to create the combinations. This handy preview tool will get you started toward the look you desire.

Examples

Lens Baby SLR Lenses

$150-270

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For more information or to purchase, visit

www.lensbaby.com

The Lens Baby Composer - A Selective Focus SLR Camera Lens : A Review in 3 Parts

Part 1 |   Part 2 |   Part 3

Comments

  1. So I’m definitely out of the loop on the original soft focus stuff – when you were shooting through different objects, was the purpose to have the entire picture look soft? If so, was it to create a dreamy effect?

    • Britt Stokes (author) says:

      Hi, thanks for your question. Yes, I was rebelling against the sharpness of modern optics. Shooting through a piece of cellophane would produce an overall soft image. You could selectively put dabs of vaseline on a cheap filter to enhance only certain areas of a shot, but this is limited really to shooting on a tripod and some trial and error. Soft focus lenses like the Sima soft focus 100mm f/2 was soft with a slightly sharper center, but you could not vary where the sharper area was – it was always in the center, so off-center subjects were sometimes rendered poorly. That is why the Lensbaby is so revolutionary, it allows the sharp sweet spot to be placed about anywhere in the frame. Thanks for reading, Britt

  2. I have the original Lensbaby and besides my 10.5 mm fisheye it is one of my most used lenses. It allows me to create a very mysterious feeling with photos. While most photogs looked at as a toy many of us were showing what great creative tool it is. The original was great for shooting on the fly producing results that could be made to look very Holga like!

    I have had to heavily restrain my self from adding one of the new ones…like after I add a D3.

    If you process images like the tree above and the park bench as a duotone with a hint sepia and a pinch of grain you might be amazed with the results!

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  5. Be My Lens, Baby!:

    Pt. 1 of 3:  Lensbaby Composer, Selective Focus SLR Camera Lens Soon after receivi.. http://tinyurl.com/chauw5