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Featured Gadgets Hardware Photography Reviews

Lensbaby Composer: Selective Focus SLR Camera Lens (pt 2)

A Three Part Series Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Pt. 2 of 3:  Be My Lens, Baby…again

Remember our fun with the Sima? The Lensbaby Composer (and all the Lensbaby line, since they use interchangeable elements) is 50mm in focal length compared with the Sima’s 100mm. That gets into the usable range for many landscape opportunities, and makes a decent average focal length for portraits and details. Need wider? They can do that… it’s that system concept I love so much. Offered as additional accessories are a 0.6x Wide Angle lens adapter and a 1.6x Telephoto lens adapter (in a set). That makes the 50mm equate to a 30mm or a 80mm lens via the front-threaded lenses. Yep, there is a macro kit as well, which would be really handy for those of us who shoot close details of things.

Instead of being happy with f/2, f/4 and f/5.6 with the Sima lens, we can now get down to f/22. Why would you want to shoot a “soft focus” image at f/22? Well, what the Sima didn’t do was skew the plane of focus… the Lensbaby skews the “sweet spot” of focus to the point you choose. Want the whole left side of the image to go completely out of focus? We can do that.



When the folks at Lensbaby shipped me the demo unit, I was very excited to open the box and find (first) a Lensbaby Composer (yes!) and a thoughtfully included set of lens elements. The Composer shipped with the double glass element in it, with the f/4 aperture. That seemed like a good starting point, so for the first several hundred shots I did with it, I left this configuration in place.

As I first handled the Composer, I was satisfied with the obvious build quality… it isn’t heavy, but feels solid. It is made of metal and composite materials, with a metal lens mount. The lens has a locking collar at the rear – if you want to lock the lens in position, simply turn the locking collar to lock it in place… since the lens doesn’t move easily on its own, I would think that most people would use the locking ring when on a tripod. Inside the lens optic, there is a magnetic arrangement that holds the f/stop apertures in place. With a little practice it is easy to drop the f/stop aperture in to the front of the lens, but if you have trouble, you can always use the handy magnetic tool provided for the task.

As previously noted, the Composer does away with the hard but flexible rubber bellows of the Lensbaby and Lensbaby 2.0. A composite ball-and-socket allows the front of the lens to move independently of the rear, creating changes in the plane of focus that the lens throws. This shifting of the plane of focus is what gives the Lensbaby its signature look.

Examples- Pt. 2


Lens Baby SLR Lenses

$150-270
Free Shipping Via USPS
For more information or to purchase, visit
www.lensbaby.com

The Lens Baby Composer – A Selective Focus SLR Camera Lens: a 3-part series

Part 1 |   Part 2 |   Part 3

Categories
Featured Hardware Photography Reviews

Lensbaby Composer: A Selective Focus SLR Camera Lens (pt 1)

A Three Part Series Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Pt. 1 of 3:  Be My Lens, Baby!

Soon after receiving my first 35mm camera, I found that photography was a little more difficult than it had first looked. Ok, it was a lot more difficult. After mastering the learning curve on how make a sharp, well-exposed photo, I saw some photography by David Hamilton and Robert Farber. I was back to square one. Suddenly, I wanted to shoot soft focus images. But, how to do it?

Shortly after graduating college, I got my first dedicated soft focus lens. I had tried all different ways of getting that beautiful soft focus look… shooting through cigarette package cellophane, smearing petroleum jelly on the filter, shooting through other materials like hose, netting, window screen, almost anything you can think of. Then came the Sima soft focus lens… 100mm at f/2 wide open, a simple single lens plastic element, push and pull focusing, it made beautiful images. It worked great… as long as you had your subject perfectly centered. The lens was sharper in the center than at the edges, so if you put your subject off center it would suffer degradation beyond the intent of soft focus. You could manipulate it slightly with an f/4 and an f/5.6 disk, plus there was a neutral density disk in the box that I never really used. The other limitation I immediately realized was the focal length; it was too long to use for most landscape situations. I moved on and tried other specialty lenses, mostly with less success than the Sima.

Then something wonderful happened… a guy like me who liked soft focus made a lens with an integral hard rubber-ish bellows to focus and bend all over the place to skew the plane of focus. Let me be clear – I experimented but never really built anything. I was content to use what others had made before me. Not so for photographer Craig Strong. He too had been unhappy with the soft focus options available to him, so he decided to do something about it, and the first Lensbaby was born. That was 2004; I found it in 2005 at PhotoExpo in New York City… when I saw the booth I went in and bought a Lensbaby 2.0.

The Lensbaby 2.0 creates beautiful images, but it has limitations for me. First, if I wanted to shoot a bracketed exposure, sometimes I found it difficult to hold the lens exactly on the focus point with the skew for a 3 or 5 shot bracket. I also had some difficulty focusing and bending the lens exactly the right way to throw the focus off a certain way. Using it on a tripod gave similar results. Forget trying to do a perfect long bracket for rendering an HDR scene… the original and version 2.0 Lensbabies were great for quick, on the move photography, but not for more studied compositions.

Jump forward to 2008. Apparently nobody mentioned to Craig Strong that he had created a great product and that he should rest on his laurels. He continued to improve the Lensbaby design, and introduced the new Lensbaby Composer. Instead of a bellows, it has a rotating ball-n-socket joint. Focus is achieved in a much more conventional fashion (to us old-school folks who were already used to focusing the lens themselves) with a rotating collar that moves the element assembly closer or farther from the sensor plane. But lo and behold, this wasn’t just an improvement on a single lens… the Lensbaby Composer had crossed over to… the system side. I remember one of the early literature pieces I saw from Nikon – it was titled the “Nikon System”. Need a right angle viewer that magnifies? Got it. How about a high-point action/sports finder? Ditto. Motor drive with 250-exposure cassette (yeah, film was somewhat precious, but what was really precious was time… like the time spent reloading your camera while the shot gets away). They can do that. Not to mention little things like the Noct Nikkor (look it up if you don’t know).

The Lensbaby and Lensbaby 2.0 had some attachments, but weren’t what I would call a system. The Lensbaby Optic Swap System is the heart of a new system of lenses that cover the spectrum of soft focus possibilities. Start with the sharpest, a double element glass lens. Second, a single glass element, followed by a single plastic element (if you have experience with a Diana or Holga, you’ll know this look). Apertures… we have apertures! Wide open the Composer is pretty soft with any of the lens optics. In the compact storage case/aperture tool housing (Lensbaby calls this the “Magnetic Aperture Set” and is included in with your first Lensbaby), you will find apertures from f/2.8 to f/22. If you are looking for f/4 in there, it is probably already in the lens. Finally, there is a fourth (and fifth?) element that thoughtfully combines a pinhole and zone plate in one housing. But wait… there’s more! All of these lens elements fit neatly into the newly redesigned Lensbaby Muse (replacing the Lensbaby original and 2.0 lenses), Control Freak (if precision soft focus, which seems something of an oxymoron, is your gig, this is the lens for you), and the Composer.

Ok, let’s do our math now. 5 lens types (double glass, single glass, plastic, zone plate and pinhole), 9 possible apertures including those in the creative aperture kit (without making your own), wide angle and telephoto converters, macro close-up kit… Without creating your own apertures from the blanks in the creative kit, there are well over one hundred different possible system configurations. Of course, you can also get there 3 different ways – the Muse, Composer or Control Freak. For those artsy readers that aren’t system oriented, don’t be alarmed… on the Lensbaby website you can preview the effects of many of the combinations… just browse to  http://www.Lensbaby.com/optic-comparison.php and use your mouse to create the combinations. This handy preview tool will get you started toward the look you desire.

Examples

Lens Baby SLR Lenses

$150-270

Free Shipping Via USPS

For more information or to purchase, visit

www.lensbaby.com

The Lens Baby Composer – A Selective Focus SLR Camera Lens : A Review in 3 Parts

Part 1 |   Part 2 |   Part 3

Categories
Digital Lifestyles Hardware The Not-So-Daily Edition

iLaundered but Still iPod

I pulled my workout pants with its myriad array of pockets out of the dryer and felt an all-too familiar lump in one of the tie-pockets. "*&^%" I thought, while pulling out my iPod Nano. There was not any visible damage. The only evidence that it went through the wash at all was the trapped moisture in the silicone case that was around it. The first thing I did was slip off the silicone case, hoping that it offered some protection. However, it was the type that left the jack exposed at the bottom in order to dock. I was fairly sure the soap and water from the washer crept into its innards. Additionally, it may have gone through the dryer twice while on a high heat setting since the pants shared space with heavy jeans. I’m thoroughly kicking myself at this point as the Nano, nicknamed "The Bat Pod," was a gift from my husband. It’s name comes from the engraving on the back: "Does it come in black?" (You get engravings like that when you get asked on the spot "What do you want on your black iPod?" when Batman Begins just gets released. His coworkers think I’m quite insane.)

Past experience with Macintosh computers in academia has taught me that liquids when spilled on Apple products are not necessarily a disaster as long as you give the device a chance to dry out thoroughly before attempting to power it on. So I let it sit on my desk for a couple of days. When it seemed certain that it was dry, I turned it on. Nothing. Then I remembered that the battery was low prior to its "trip." It connected successfully to the USB cable and gave me the familiar charging screen, which at the time seemed to me a digital "thumbs up." Sure enough, after an hour "The Bat Pod" came up in iTunes and on the Desktop. And the media was still on it! To be safe, I went ahead and reset it to factory defaults for a clean *cough* start. Only one injury persists, and that the menu button doesn’t work anymore. But I deserve that.

 

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Gadgets Hardware Photography Reviews Workflow

Ray Flash: The Ring Flash Adapter

Ray Flash, a portable ring light for your Canon or Nikon DSLR camera system

Tonight I was making whipped cream for my wife’s dessert. It brought back fond memories of my mother making whipped cream, usually at Thanksgiving or Christmas, and I almost always got to lick a beater from the mixer. That was worth running from anywhere in the house – getting a beater with the thick, sweet whipped cream on it. Ah, those were the days. That is, until now.

A few weeks ago I got a box in the mail… the box was bigger than the hand mixer my mother used, but what it contained was sweeter than whipped cream. It was the Ray Flash attachment for my Nikon SB-800 flash unit, designed to transform an ordinary flash into a ring flash. This model was specifically for my D2X or D3, although it would also work on my old D1X. Ha… Christmas came early this year. And, I didn’t have to fight my brother for it.

Ring flash has an almost mystical following in the fashion and photography world. Ring lights are generally expensive, heavy, dedicated units that fit one manufacturer’s brand of flash pack. They can be very cumbersome to use hand-held. Oh, but that light… the wrap-around quality of shadow-less light is hard to create with any other equipment. The light produces a crisp catch-light in the model’s eye, with very even illumination and quick falloff.  The light that you can now, with your existing equipment, mount on your Nikon or Canon camera!

Imagine if you will a ring light that mounts directly to your camera mounted flash unit, and redirects the light into a perfect circle of light surrounding your lens.  Now imagine that it works totally TTL (through the lens metering with your camera’s exposure system)… finally imagine that it only costs about $300, not closer to $1,000 or more. OK, quit dreaming… it is here, in a real product that you can use now.

Let’s look at what you get in the box. First, you find the ring flash itself, with a head specifically designed for your model of flash (Nikon SB-800 or Canon 580EX). The ring slides on over the lens and the head cover slides onto the head of your flash and with a quick twist of a knob on top, locks securely to your flash. Second you will find a small Ziploc bag of shims… the shims are provided for the head if your flash head tends to droop under the weight. Finally, a short instruction manual. Do you need the manual? Probably not, but it is nice to have.

So far I have shot with two lenses, the Nikkor 24-120 AF VR and the Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 AF. I shot the 24-120 without the lens hood, as it stuck a couple of inches in front of the ring light. I kept the lens hood on the 50mm, as it was much shorter. Here is what I found… first, on the 24-120, it isn’t easy to zoom… the zoom ring is pretty close to the body of the ring light. It is possible with nimble fingers, and I think it could be learned with a little practice. The 50mm had no such problems. I think an ideal lens is my 85mm f/1.8, although I have currently loaned it out to a friend.

So, what do I like about the Ray Flash? Well, for what you are getting, it is relatively lightweight. It stays easily mounted to the camera, and doesn’t get in the way of the camera straps or camera controls with a couple of exceptions… the controls that are a little blocked are the mirror lockup, autofocus mode selector switch, and lens mount button. With the 50mm, I could simply swing the whole assembly carefully up and make needed adjustments, but the 24-120 wasn’t quite as easy. All the exposures are TTL reliable, with all your adjustments being easily controlled from the back of the flash. You do have to use either TTL or manual flash modes, as the Auto mode won’t work… the photo receptor on the front of the flash body is blocked by the Ray Flash. I can’t remember the last time that I used Auto mode on a flash… probably more than 10 years at least. Want to turn vertical from horizontal? Well this is complicated… just turn the camera. Ha. No more rotating the head of the flash – it’s round!
Teen model Lindsay photographed with Nikon D3 with SB-800 and diffusion dome… note the telltale shadow on the wall. Surely we can do better for such a pretty girl.

 

Same location but photographed after removing the diffusion dome and installing the Ray Flash ring light on the SB-800.

I found several nice uses for the Ray Flash. First and most obvious, I had to find a pretty young lady to photograph for my testing. Lindsay was as easy to work with as the Ray Flash. First we did a test shot with my normal flash arrangement (turning the camera to portrait mode and rotating the SB-800 flash head to match). This usually works well, but if you have a wall or other object fairly close to the back of your subject, you will normally get a rather objectionable shadow on the side of your subject. Next I installed the Ray Flash, and shot the same photo – presto, magico… the shadow went away, and Lindsay’s face was beautifully and evenly illuminated. We shot at a couple of locations, both in open shade and then the lowering gloom of a late fall post-sunset evening. The shots turned out great. I played with the adjustment on the flash to get the illumination level correct with the changing ambient light.

Lindsay posing about four feet from the turquoise garage door… this shot was in open shade just as the sun was going down.

Did somebody say wireless? Commander Ray, front and center! Yes, the Ray Flash works with the Nikon wireless TTL system – program your other SB wireless compatible lights as slaves, set the one on your camera as master, and prepare to make some really funky cool photos. As long as the photo eyes on the side of the slaves can see the ring flash go off, you should be in business.

Lindsay posing about four feet from the turquoise garage door- this shot was in open shade just as the sun was going down.

Another nice use is fill flash on close-up subjects, like flowers. I even did a shot of a couple of my trusty, if dusty, F2 to see what it looked like – worked just fine. I set up a second SB-800 as a background light to make it interesting.

Until I looked at this shot in Photoshop’s Camera Raw  module, I had not realized how really dusty my trusty  F2 camera is. Another use for the RayFlash is shooting  quick photo illustrations like this one to use for online  auctions. This was shot with the RayFlash mounted on  my SB-800 plus 1-2/3 stops with a Nikkor 60mm  Micro lens. In the full-sized version of this photo you  can see every glorious scratch and dent of this 1972  camera.

Ok Britt, you say, there has to be some kind of downside, some trade off with the Ray Flash. Well, there is – the Ray Flash is only as powerful as the flash you mount it on.  An SB-800 has a guide number high enough to be very useful, but you do lose some light in the Ray Flash. On the D3, that is not a big deal – just go up from ISO 200 to ISO 400 and shoot away.  (I found my best results for portraits were shots done within about 8 to 10 feet of the subject. For exact information, refer to chart on the Ray Flash page at  HYPERLINK "http://www.expoimaging.com" www.expoimaging.com.) It is somewhat bulky, and does block some camera controls, but no more than any other ring flash I have seen short of the small macro photo ring flashes that Nikon makes. And to be fair, the $300 price is a little steep for some people, but let’s be completely fair and say that the ring light attachment for my studio strobes costs about $1,400 and you have to lug a $3,000 pack with you that weighs 25 pounds. Oh, don’t forget that you have to have AC power or an expensive battery pack unit to actually use it. Is the studio strobe ring flash more powerful? Absolutely. Is it more convenient for fast-moving location work? Not a chance.
This shot is cropped to show the catch light in Lindsay's eye from the Ray Flash ring light. This is typical, although it seems that the further the subject is from the flash, the less defined the dark spot in the center of the catch light is. Love those freckles!

The bottom line is, if you shoot Nikon or Canon DSLR’s and want ring flash capability out in the real world, get a Ray Flash.

Oh, yeah… after I made the whipped cream, I got both beaters. What a day – playing with the Ray Flash and getting the beaters. Gotta e-mail my brother. He he he…

Ray Flash is imported to the United States by ExpoImaging, the same folks who bring us the ExpoDisc. It is available from select photo dealers or directly from ExpoImaging at  www.expoimaging.net or 1-800-446-5086. ExpoImaging stands behind their products and offers free telephone technical support from 9am to 5pm Pacific Time Monday through Friday.
 

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Commerce Digital Lifestyles Hardware Software Workflow

Drawing on my Computer…

One of the most amusing things I feel about my job is the lack of knowledge most people have of it.  I often have people ask what I do for a living. If they know I office out of my home then I their fist vision of me is sitting around in my PJs watching opera with a diet coke in one hand and letting my nails dry on the other.  I may or may not have a computer sitting next to me, but most likely not or else it would be in the way of those feet I am propping up.

For some reason, it’s hard for people to grasp that you can WORK from home and actually make a living.  It even took my husband a long time to figure out that if I didn’t work billable hours, then I didn’t get a paycheck, therefore “NO, I did not get your 10 loads of laundry done today.” Now that he works from home one day a week to offset the cost of gas to drive to his Atlanta office, he sees that there are no bonbons or soap operas in my office.  But to those who do not see my daily routine  – it’s hard for them to imagine one having the self-discipline enough to “work from home” 

There are also those who understand the concept that I work, but not really what I DO.  In try to explain in layman’s terms that “I am a designer of all things that can be either printed on something or put on the web” That way (and I have had this before) I didn’t have to answer yes to their 30 item survey of “can you do’s” But yet even in layman’s, they still do not grasp that that billboard didn’t just magically appear on that highway or the website they use everyday to check their bank balance didn’t just come from air. It’s quite funny actually to watch the reactions people make when I tell them what I do.  Either they are immediately intrigued or they look like someone handed them a Su Doku puzzle and asked them to solve it on 30 seconds.

One of my favorite questions about my job I get every time I go home for a visit and see a particular elementary teacher who is always very intrigued by my talent.  She always very respectfully says “ Are you still drawing on your computer” I have learned just to say yes as sometimes it is just easier for people to visualize it that way. Little do they know that I haven’t “drawn” since I was in “Life Drawing” my last semester in College.  But that is okay.  To some people, making art requires a pencil or paintbrush and paper. The extremists of this line of thinking tend to believe that graphic arts/advertising isn’t really art at all.  But that is a whole other argument all-together that I will not attempt to get into. I will however, put out there for those who still don’t understand how I “draw on my computer” a little peek into my daily thought process – while I am eating my bon-bon of course!

Without too much detail, here is a sample scenario of one project I may get in a day….

Most of the time I already have at least 5 jobs in production and take on one new. Client calls after being referred to me by another client or one of my partners.  They are a new business or an only business seeing a new identity.  They need it all.  Website, collateral package, logo for starters.

I visit with the client usually for at least 30 min, sometimes with multiple people on a conference call.  This is typical with the majority of my client base being out of state.  The customer outlines their current situation – where they have been and where they want to go.  I ask them if they have competitors so I can see what our marketing is up against.  I also ask for samples of directions they like.  Some customers have the taste of a dry popsicle stick and others actually have a great concept of where they want their company to go. This is fantastic as mind reading is not part of my job description even though I have done it  –  a lot.  Once I get an idea of where they have been and want to go, I outline what elements they need.  Logo, collateral package (consisting of letterhead, envelopes and business cards sometimes even a brochure), and website.  I’ve made my notes, gotten a feel for the personalities of the client (which is VERY important) and I am ready to build my estimate.  Sometimes If I can tell that the client is on the smaller side of the business, I ask if they have a budget so I know up front how realistic their expectations are.  However if I know the client is larger and has the advertising budget to handle my hourly rate, I do not worry about asking as sometimes this can limit your creative thinking when estimating.  After I build by estimate and deliver it to the customer I usually get approval within a few days.  In the meantime I am frantically trying to wrap up other projects to make room.  When I receive the signed estimate I begin the research and concept phase.  This is the most crucial part of my job.

Because it is said so perfectly and so inline with my way of “concepting”, I will quote "The Three C’s of Design" excerpted from Jim Krause’s “Design Basics Index”:

COMPOSITION
The way in which the components of a design are visually combined and arranged.  Composition takes into account placement, grouping, alignment, visual flow and the divisions of space within a layout. 

COMPONENTS
The visual elements used within a design,  Photos illustrations, icons, typography, linework, decorations, borders and backgrounds are all components.

CONCEPT
Abstract elements of theme, connotation, message and style.  These intangible ingredients of a design or image are critical to its visual presentation and delivery of message.

And I am going to add a personal touch to this by adding a 4th….

CREATIVITY
The thought and  vision that sets this customer’s design/concept apart from those of its competitors.  The eye-popping, get you thinking Idea behind the design.

This is the method to my madness.  I know that it is hard to “visualize” for some people, but there is a “vision” in a designer’s head before they even use their tools to built it.  The Composition, Components, Concept and Creativity are what make that Billboard catch the attention of a diver passing by at 68.5 miles per hour.  It is what makes people choose one vendor over another when searching the web for a particular item. It is what determines a “keeper” over junk” when sorting through your mail. Advertising does not work without these four C’s. 

After a day (maybe more depending on how many pieces are involved) of exploring these 4 and putting together my presentation I post these for the client to review and stew over for a few days.  Almost every time I have a unanimous decision and approval to move forward with one of my concepts within a day. Then the hard work comes in.  I collect data for the sites, build all of the pieces to flow seamlessly and work with the client for the next few weeks to get all the details just right before sending to the printer or uploading to the site.

Once approved and delivered, I most likely have already bid and started a few other jobs and it’s on to start those I go. And this folks is what I “do”, I am sad to disappoint those who were looking for the use of charcoal on a sketch pad as my final product but I will say I do sketch out concepts to get them clear in my head. So I guess you can say that I do “draw” a little.  Just not on my computer.  Hopefully this will also show for those who just don’t understand that (even though I wish it did) my day doesn’t have much room for the latest profound advice of Dr. Phil or round of “whites” in the washer in-between phone calls. I will say that without all that I have just about the coolest job there is.  Even without the bonbons.

 

Categories
Art Commentary Digital Lifestyles Hardware Photography Software Workflow

The Computer, Slow Food and Stone

When Goethe suggests that the artist is a universal character, writer, painter, musician, philosopher and general good citizen, it’s a pity he didn’t have a Mac to organize his production.  Garage Band keeps my music in order and progressing, emails and the Internet help me communicating and stay in touch, Photoshop helps experimentation with images and iMovie looks to give an introduction to the world of moving images. We have the orchestra at our fingertips‚Äînow what can we build from this?

I’m writing from a small village in the Ardeche in southern France. Having just returned from my morning walk up the hill behind my house, I began thinking about a subject  that has been on my mind a lot lately:  How to integrate work and life into a harmonious whole where the work, the place, the people,  time available and the entire natural world hum. It just occurred to me, half way through my coffee that the computer is the tool that can link these elements together. In a way, this seems obvious, but how now, in our troubled times does it work and what can it mean and what can a computer do in this context of ‘going back to Nature’ particularly as it relates to the arts? Apple seems to have  understood this new concept the best, indeed has made it possible.  And here is some background to my thinking.

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Digital Lifestyles Hardware Photography Workflow

Musings on Washing Machines and CompactFlash cards

If you have read any of my previous articles, you will already know that as a writer I tend to ramble, and that I am a photographer and computer geek. I like cameras more than computers, but use both every day.

One personality trait I have not shared in the past is my hang-up about things working… I like objects to work the way I want, when I want, every time. Yes, I will spend more money on an object if I believe that it will perform the way I want over a lower priced version of the same object. I spent more money on a clothes washer about two years ago than I really wanted to… I got a nicer front loader that had some features I wanted, and uses far less water than top loaders.

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Commerce Digital Lifestyles Hardware Photography Workflow

The Nikon D3

I was always an F kind of guy. My first Nikon pro camera was the original F – a 1971 black body FTN. It supplemented my FM2 and I had it until just a couple of years ago when I sold it to a close friend, who bought it with the understanding that I might occasionally need to fondle it… call it conjugal visits.

A few years later I found a really nice F2 that I still have… I skipped the F3 and F4 entirely

Categories
Hardware

The Scent of a New Computer

Some people think that the scent of a new automobile is the most exhilarating thing around, but I have to think that the scent of brushed aluminum, fresh electronic chips, and computer plastic beats out the automobile category.  At least it does for me.

Categories
Hardware

Wacom Cintiq

For about a week now I have been playing with my new toy…no, scratch that, rather I have been evaluating my new Wacom 12" Cintiq drawing tablet. 

Categories
Hardware Photography

Camdapter by Jim Garavuso vs Nikon SLR Hand Strap

A former student of mine dropped by to show me his new Nikon D80 camera.  He stopped in because he knew my wife had the same model and he wanted some help with a couple of menu choices.

I noticed a handstrap on the right side of his camera, into which he slipped his right hand, which left his other hand free to support its long lens. This is a feature he uses frequently shooting sports and wildlife. Having just come back into the world of pro-weight cameras, and being older than I once was, I realized this might now be for me too.