iPad2 Review: OK, I MUST BE A FANBOY

On March 11, the first day iPad 2’s were available for order, at 5 A.M. I got up to go to the bathroom (something common when you are 73 years old), and on a whim sat down at the computer and ordered an iPad. White, 64GB wifi only, with a spare power supply, a Camera Connection package, VGA and Digital AV Adapters, and a red leather cover. I had intended to make this order eventually, and the computer seemed to call to me as I returned from the bathroom. It was a good thing too, as within 24 hours the waiting time had switched from 3-5 days to 2-4 weeks.

My wife wanted white for the color and a red leather cover, and since she is to be the primary user, what she wants—she gets.

The accessories arrived two days before the iPad itself, but on the 25th of March the iPad duly arrived via FedEX, and within forty-five minutes I had loaded Keynote, Pages, the Kindle reader, Good Reader for PDF reading, and put Facebook and Google News Apps in the list of instantly available icons, and had the mail configured as well as going to the Kindle bookstore and choosing Lonely Planet’s travel guide for Iceland and adding two books that were already on my Kindle shelf on my MacBook Pro. How’s that for knowing right off what I wanted to do? All that in forty-five minutes.

Since my wife is traveling to Iceland this summer, our goal was to have an easier to use communication device so we can email one another back and forth easily without her having to carry her laptop. So I set up a unique Gmail account for use on the trip only and we won’t have to sort through spam and extraneous mail from others to get to the specific day to day communication.

My wife is a teacher, also, and her goal is to use Keynote and Pages which she uses regularly from her laptop in the classroom, and get her Art History and Art Appreciation slide lectures on an iPad and not have to carry her MacBook Pro to class with her along with the stack of books she usually has along for show and tell in the lectures and discussions. Anything to lighten the load is the goal.

Any reader who can suggest the easiest way to get large PDF files onto the iPad without trying to mail them please give me a hint. I’ve discovered that her lectures are too large to mail since they are loaded with images in the keynote presentations and exceede the 25 MB file size for my mail service. So what do you think are the easiest ways to move large PDF files? Googling how to on that gives some answers but they all seem relatively complex; can anyone suggest a simple method?

I’m still hunting and pecking on the keyboard with high speed single finger typing. I just can’t seem to get my fingers on the correct keys on the virtual keyboard. It looks like I will add a Mac Bluetooth keyboard as some reviewers have suggested. It can sit quietly on the desk until needed at home, and for travel the hunt and peck may be the answer unless my wife’s hands can do a better job with the virtual keyboard than mine do.

The red leather cover is a deep red and the leather is luxurious and feels very good to the hand. The magnets snap into place perfectly every time that the cover is removed and replaced.

My only previous experience with an iPad was about 10 minutes looking at pictures on a friend’s first generation iPad, and I was a bit hesitant as to how fast I would pick up the gestures and operations of the touch controls. I should not have worried. In 15 minutes with the manual in the bookmarks and I had it. The remaining thirty minutes and I had ordered and installed three apps, Kindle books, and configured security and mail. Leave this iPad alone for 15 minutes and it locks itself up for protection and requires a four digit unlock code. My wife, who is a quick learner, did it even quicker, I believe if I’d left her alone she could have done all I did setting up in less time than it took me.

I wont’t go over all the uses and potential uses of the iPad, I’ll simply say I’m hooked and I guess I qualify as a Fanboy and I’ll admit it. The iPad just works.

Comments

  1. Ken Russell says:

    In iTunes with iPad device selected, go to Apps tab and scroll down to File Sharing and select GoodReader. Then just copy pdf files to GoodReader Documents and sync.

  2. Ausaf Bari says:

    To move large PDF files you can use the wireless connection method from within GoodReader. This will mount your iPad as a drive on your laptop. Drag the PDF over. Read the PDF in GoodReader.

    From GoodReader you can transfer the PDF internally to open in another iPad program if you prefer.

  3. Thanks to all who gave me great hints; am working on seeing which is best for me right now as I write. Thanks much!!!!

  4. or you can upload the files to our servers & use FTP TO GO available here:
    http://tinyurl.com/ftptogo-ipad

    though I love Dropbox … that should be easy enough…

  5. Michael Subasic says:

    Air Sharing PRO is what I use. It turns the iPad/iPhone into a server that you can connect to wirelessly from your home systems and copy over any files you like. Works very well.

    I did this with a folder that have around 200 subdirectories in it, and it was the only way to have that much content available. Dropbox was too slow in delivering the directory list, same for iDisk.

    And you can copy files to it from *any* computer (windows/Linux/OSX) over the wireless network (username/pwd authentication).

  6. “Any reader who can suggest the easiest way to get large PDF files onto the iPad without trying to mail them please give me a hint.”

    How about adding the PDF to iTunes and accessing on the iPad via iBooks?

    To do this:
    in iTunes, File > Add to Library. Navigate to your PDF(s) and select it (them). Then hook up the iPad to the computer. In iTunes, select the iPad on the left hand, then navigate to Books (?). Select either “sync all” or “sync selected” (I’m not at my machine so these may no be the exact words). If you selected Sync selected, select the PDF you wanted. Then hit Sync in the bottom right.

    Whew. Now in iBooks on the iPad, on the Library screen, tap Collections and select PDFs. Your PDF should be in the list (or on the bookshelf).

  7. James Katt says:

    Exactly.
    Use Dropbox.
    It’s free for 2 GB of storage.

    It automatically synchronizes with your Mac or PC.

  8. Any reader who can suggest the easiest way to get large PDF files onto the iPad without trying to mail them please give me a hint.

    One word or two?
    Dropbox.com
    Sugarsync.com