Categories
ArtWorks Featured

Christy DeKoning on Marketing Art

 

Featured interview artist logo

paris-christy-copy
Tell us about your marketing journey… How did you start? When did you discover that you needed to market?

It’s funny, but marketing seems to have come naturally to me. I used to work in offices as a marketing/creative assistant, so when I decided that I was ready to work at portraits on a full-time basis, it seemed logical to start talking to people online about it. I joined Etsy and that really got the ball rolling. My work tends to market itself, because people love to show off paintings of their family members to their friends, which in turn leads to more business for me – marketing is almost secondary to “word-of-mouth” advertising, which is my number one source of commissions.

Do you have a marketing plan,strategy if so please summarize?

No. I just wake up in the morning and decide if I’m going to paint first, blog first, or “twitter” away my morning.

Do you use Social media online alone or do you combine it with off-line efforts?

I have very little off-line marketing – 90% of my clients are international, which all comes from online marketing. I try to stay involved with my community as much as possible, so a certain amount of time is spent at local art shows, but I rely on social media for most of my connections.

collection

One of the things Christy has in common with the other artists to be featured here is her willingness to offer non-traditional ways for her clients to enjoy her work. She tastefully incorporates her work into post cards, jewelry, greeting cards and other accessories.  In doing so she and the other artists show an understanding of the client/customer courtship process I have talked about. These low cost alternatives give her buyers a chance to experience how she treats buyers and in the process increase their trust which in the end may lead to larger purchases. Additionally, she can offer the accesserories as upsells or as complimentary gift to big ticket buyers or collectors.

Another example of both trust building and understanding the client courtship model is Christy’s willingness to share her process. Scattered through out her blog are numerous examples of mini-tutorials demonstrating her creative process. Some may worry that doing such a thing is tantamount to giving away state secrets but research has shown just the opposite. Artists, like Christy know the difference between style and technique, they know that no amount of “secrets” can give another person the ability to copy her style, her work will always be identifiable. More than sharing techniques her tutorials ofer a window into her creative journey and in the process build trust and adds another layer of uniqueness for her potential clients.

tutorialTo see the marketing styles mentioned above check out Christy’s Blog, Artfire store and Etsy Store just click the links below:

etsylogo

Accessories

Original Paintings

Main Shop

afv--21799--logo1

Blog

3271203603_23a6b616a2_m-copy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Related posts:

  1. Interview with Robin Pedrero-on marketing Tell us ab
  2. Artsyfartsy Biz Inspiration: Featured Artists A few week
  3. Robin Pedrero on vision and growth Desire and

 


 

Visit TheArtistsCenter.com

Categories
ArtWorks Featured

Marketing Monday: Back to the Future

Since we are doing this the sensible way and getting all  of our ducks in a row before we  even crack the ballroom door we need to shift the time -space continuum and put you there with your new found outlook. If you just went ahead and blasted your way into that room obsessed with finding somebody anybody to dance with you may or may not have had the results we envisioned when we took a time jumped to get you all fixed up and ready to go. You likely would have been working from the Fonz’s playbook and started strutting you stuff like peacock, and we know you really aren’t a peacock.

Continuing to operate as if you are a peacock will really only guarantee that you attract people who like peacocks and we know how that story ends. So its really best to ditch the feathers and just be yourself because that’s what’s going to get you the best result. See, to really have the best longest lasting results you have to be real and you have to know that vision of who it is you are looking for right there in front of you. In fact, without being to whoowhooey, if you name that person, and can describe that person it is very easy to move to calling up that person’s presence. In other words, if you keep her in your mind when you enter that ballroom she’ll know you’re there and turn her head just to confirm it.

Who,What….no where

Let’s take this back to reality now and translate it into you actually sitting at a show, hosting an opening, or describing your latest creation on your blog. When you know and can recognize that special just right customer you’re more able to talk to them as if you have known them forever. And that my friend, is the best ice break ever because what you have done is acknowledge who they are, in the process you’re opening the door and welcoming them in to get more acquainted. They are more likely to join you if you know their name and in turn know what they need. In marketing language the process you have just initiated is called (drum role please) your “who & What”, which is you naming who “gets” your art and why your art is for them.

So…for example, as a painter  your W&W might be: “I bring color into people’s lives by creating bright and energetic landscapes using a mix of acrylics, and other mediums.”  Or as a photographer mine is ” I help people capture their life stories through visual conversations”.

Keep in mind not everyone will hear you or recognize you, it may take several encounters before you are recognized as having what they want. Remember the dance… it took her several looks before she wanted to see what it was like to dance with you. You had her attention and in order to keep her attention you have to make the time with her about her  because she wants to check you out at her pace. Is this starting to sound familiar? It should because you are building trust here right now, but it goes beyond just trust. She wants to know if what you have to offer is worth her time and energy, if not she’ll just move on.

Support, Patience and Grace

At this stage you only want her to be open to the possibilities of a relationship with you, like going on an actual date, that’s all…no marriage,no moving in together, just a date. Don’t forget though that you do have an ultimate goal of her becoming your SO (significant other) and for that to happen, she has to feel that its’ in her best interest to get to know you better. Until she knows this, she will move at her own pace and may likely become resistant because you are ultimately wanting her to move out of her comfort zone.

In real world terms this part of the courtship is about support, patience, and grace. Your customers need to know that you support them in their time and space by patiently and gracefully understanding their need to move at their own pace. Once, they feel the warmth of your support they will start to be more open to recognizing the common outlooks the two of you share which in turn make them more agreeable to a relationship.

Where’s Waldo

We have come a long way but we’re not done yet. Yes, your time spent on the W&W was extremely helpful and eye opening but you still have to tweek things a little more. Even though you know their names, you really have to find out more about them as people so you can find them and they can find you. The ways to for this to happen are limited because success hinges on communication, and visibility. You have to know where they hang out and what language they speak so you can not only be visible to them but also, heard.

As an artist one of the best ways to be both visible and heard is to have a place that can serve to spread your word and that place now is a blog, coupled with social media tools like Facebook and twitter. You can also add, teaching workshops, giving talks to community groups about art both activities will build your credibility as someone to do business with because you are giving value with minimal investment on their part.
Sometimes straight but usually Crooked

Crooked or straight you’ll still get there

Finally, it is important for you to understand that the sales/buying process is not necessarily linear and it doesn’t move at any preset pace. Even more important you need to understand that before anyone can decide to join your tribe, give you permission to send them stuff, they need to trust you. This is the point  where you work on building that trust so they can see your value enough to agree to move closer to being one of your loyal fans.

If you take anything away from this it should be the importance of letting go of any attachments to time tables, sequences or out comes. By doing so you will be free to  let the notion of your perfect customer complete with their needs, develop organically, which in the end will lead to a more solid mutually supportive relationship.

 

Related posts:

  1. Marketing Monday: anatomy of a courtship These first few steps of the courtship dance are all…
  2. Marketing Monday: courtship the unliniear way Ok now is the time to really, take a close…
  3. Marketing Monday: Off-line Tactics Today we’re going take a break from twits & upd8s…

 


 

Visit TheArtistsCenter.com

Categories
ArtWorks Featured

Robin Pedrero on vision and growth

How has your art evolved over time?

homagehomelessherow-copyDesire and necessity are the catalysts in the evolution of my art. I often tell the story of how my two year old painted white oil paint on a portrait I was working on which spurred my investment in the medium of pastel.  I tackled the medium through book instruction, and one class with Herman Marguiles to fall in love with the immediacy and vibrancy of pastels to then become a juried Signature Member of the Pastel Society of America. I have been a portrait artist for over 20 years .  I incorporate faces and figures into my work as well.  Nature has always been my refuge. I believe when we savor nature it creates a space in time to experience the presence of God.  Works from 2001 – 2008 depict landscapes with a focus on the sky. My style has gone from impressionistic to realistic to more contemporary and abstract. Necessity steps in again as I am shipping more and I sought a medium that would not require glass. My health concerns keep me from working in oil regularly; hence acrylic has become my most recent medium. I am discovering that I really enjoy how I can use translucency so effectively in acrylics. So stay tuned to see my newest works and how my work is evolving. and in progress

What is your vision for your art?

My art inspires and brings joy. I believe it makes a difference in people’s lives. I see my work in Museums, galleries, corporations, institutions and collected worldwide.

What do you see your work doing for those who buy it?

People use my artwork differently, most are attracted to it because it speaks to their core. They experience something sacred and personal between themselves and the work. It’s ok if it also matches your decor, let’s be honest here, our homes and offices reflect who we are and if it works in harmony whether matching or eclectic it still works! I teach people to see things in different ways yet communicate on a spiritual level using color, line, form and subject matter. A common response to my work is that people feel a sense of peace, contentment, powerful emotion or joy and I like that!

Related posts:

  1. Robin Pedrero on motivation, inspiration and influence First, tell us about your work? My work is a…
  2. Featured Artist: Robin Pedrero I respond to what catches my eyes and heart using…


Visit TheArtistsCenter.com

Categories
ArtWorks Featured

Interview with Robin Pedrero-on marketing

Tell us about your marketing journey…how did you start?

I learned a few things from my mother who did PR for our theater group, when I danced and sang in musicals. Her example taught me to be fearless about just asking or sending something in to the press, radio or TV stations.

When did you discover that you needed to market?

When I moved to Florida in 1988 and began painting portraits for just $25, word of mouth spread the news. Now my portraits are $1200 – $5500, and  people who bought my early work are collecting new work from me. My next move took me away from the community who knew me as an artist. Now, I had to work at building a good reputation as an artist all over again in a new place. I started by landing a show, joined groups, and participated in central Florida art events. As you grow your business you expand your territory. The relationships that you build will carry your business around the world especially if you use social network media.

Do you have a marketing plan, strategy if so please summarize?

My strategy is perseverance and sharing. I never stop working. My goals inspire the marketing I pursue. Most marketing is event and project oriented, building my brand, which is my name, my art. I might be unusual for an artist because I find the business of art fun!

Do you use Social media online alone or do you combine it with off-line efforts?

My first thought is if it is free and I can do it myself I use it, both online and offline. I have paid for ads in magazines, art guides, newspapers and radio broadcasts, yet my own efforts to build and maintain contact with my collectors personally are the most fruitful.

What has been the reaction to your making your work available in non-traditional ways, like mugs, jewelry etc?

In gauging buyers both my art collectors and those who would not typically purchase 2D art are attracted and purchasing.
cafe_press_coll

Has it been successful?

As a new endeavor, I had hoped for more sales, yet I haven’t focused on marketing the products extensively.  I would really like more venues to pick up the products. Would I recommend it? Yes of course! Low overhead, easy shipping and the items make great gifts for my collectors at the touch of my fingertips!

Have you seen it effect sales of originals or prints?

I have had people buy items then later buy originals. I see these items as another form of advertising as well. When products are used they are a conversation piece.

Where do most of your sales come from?

80 % of my sales come from 20% of my collector base. I adore my collectors! It saddens me when I don’t get to know who bought a piece, yet as my sales increase in galleries sometimes that occurs. I do ask my galleries to share a handwritten thank you from me to my new collector.

Related posts:

  1. Robin Pedrero on vision and growth Desire and necessity are the catalysts in the evolution of…
  2. Robin Pedrero on motivation, inspiration and influence First, tell us about your work? My work is a…
  3. Featured Artist: Robin Pedrero I respond to what catches my eyes and heart using…


Visit TheArtistsCenter.com

Categories
ArtWorks Featured

Profile: Robin Pedrero on Motivation, Inspiration and Influence

Tell us about your work?

My work is a visual journey, exploring what calls me, often those things which bring me joy or contemplation. My work is spiritual, color saturated with symbolic and natural elements.

What mediums have you worked in and which is your favorite?

take-the-yellow-road-etsy-copyI have worked in oil, soft pastel, oil pastel, watercolor, acrylic, gouche, pen and ink, charcoal, textile, collage, colored pencil, mixed media, photography and assemblage. My favorite is whatever I am working in at the moment to get the effect I desire – ok pastel, no, acrylic, see I can’t play favorites.

How did you get started?

My early memories include painting in kindergarten, as a child I recall many summers drawing on a huge chalk board under a tree. I was always crafting and creating. I began oil painting with master artists when I was 13 years old. I began selling art at 15 in a gift store.

Who has influenced/inspired your art work?

As my work evolves those artists who influence me change. I began as a teen artist drawn to Picasso, Dali, Van Gogh, Impressionists, Brackman followed by many years while a young mother adoring Renoir, and Cassatt then Bouguereau. My work circa 1990 reflects these interests seen here. Then Turner, Waterhouse ….. and the list grows with more contemporary artists and variations of style. I call my work a visual journey encompassing inspirations in my life; family, friends, travel, nature, meals, introspection, books, art, music and worship. Influences and inspiration are daily occurrences, experienced through all of the senses.

You have written about how music and rhythm influence your work…tell us a little more.

I am always intrigued at how all of the arts inspire and influence one another. Masterpieces encompass multiple art forms; performance, film, fine art, music, dances, etc. Interestingly rhythms in one art form like music can inspire rhythms or creativity in another form like fine art or dance. Rhythm usually brings music or dance to mind, yet it plays more than one part in the life of visual artists. Often I will listen to the same music or series of songs while working on a piece of art. Music sets a mood. We rely on all of our senses to create and music can be stimulating even intoxicating as we inhabit our own world of creation. I play particular music to accommodate looseness in my motions to carry through to the work or another style of music for more detailed concentration. The movements I make in creating can carry the rhythm of what I hear. Many titles to my works of art reference music.

Related posts:

  1. Featured Artist: Robin Pedrero I respond to what catches my eyes and heart using…
  2. Artsyfartsy Biz Inspiration: Featured Artists A few weeks ago we launched our Artsyfartsy Biz Award…

 


 

Visit TheArtistsCenter.com

Categories
Parallel Desktops

4 Mac Apps that speed YOU up

Many people are obsessed with speed and I happily include myself in that category, at least with respect to the performance I get from my computer. Whether it’s a faster processor, more memory, a quicker graphics card or a new high-speed hard drive, upgrading to the latest and greatest translates into getting things done more quickly.

It’s not enough to just throw hardware at a problem, sometimes you have to optimize yourself. Of course I can do this by inhaling a rather large quantity of coffee first thing in the morning but what I’m talking about is finding applications that can improve how you use your computer. Though Macs have incredibly high usability right out of the box, over the last year I’ve found 4 applications that have really helped me improve my efficiency on my Mac. I’ve tried quite a few but these are the applications I’ve stuck with and found most valuable to me.

1Password
Like many people I spend a lot of time in a web browser (actually both Safari and Firefox). It seems that each site has a different cookie policy and password standard and each browser has different reliability when it comes to remembering my login credentials. You want to lose time during the day doing something that doesn’t add any value other than challenging the Grey Matter to a memory exercise? Try remembering the username and password for every site that requires it. Think about the amount of time you waste when you try to log in and try every variation of a password you can think of, or waiting for a password reminder to come back to you in e-mail.

Then think about the repetitive forms with your contact information that need to be filled out and the purchase sites where you have to enter in your credit card details. Finally toss in those times when you need your frequent flyer number or child’s social security number or application’s license code.

1Password does a fantastic job of handling all of this for me. It plants itself in the toolbar of my browser and makes logging in to a site a one or two click affair. It will offer to remember my login credentials the first time I use it and then it retains it after that. Now when I hit nearly any form I can just tell 1Password to fill it out for me and it usually completes most of the common fields without any typing on my part.

Now that I have it synchronizing my 1Password data automatically through DropBox (which is a free service), both the Macs I use on a regular basis are current all the time. It is seamless and completely wonderful.

I realize I sound like I’m gushing about this application but it’s one of those “you have to try it to appreciate it” types of things. It’s also one of the few applications I immediately bought a family license for and put on my wife and kid’s Macs. At $39.95 (single user) and $69.95 (family 5-pack) it’s not the cheapest utility you can buy but well worth the money.

LaunchBar
I have a confession: I am a keyboard junkie. I’ll use an easily remembered keystroke combination over a mouse movement every time. It was for this reason that one of the first features in OS X I became enamored with was Spotlight. The ability to hit Command-Space and just type in the name of something and launch it by hitting Return was excellent.

The issue was that Spotlight had some issues about the time I was starting to really use it and I ended up trying out QuickSilver. While QuickSilver was great I started to see some minor issues with it and at the time the author of QuickSilver was indicating he was walking away from the project (that has since changed I believe). It was at this point that I started playing with LaunchBar and I’ve been hooked ever since.

LaunchBar makes it really fast to get to the application I want, whether it’s running or not. Command-Space (I moved Spotlight to Control-Space), type in a couple letters and hit Return. It’s much faster than Spotlight and allows me to do more than just launch an application. It also learns my personal shortcuts so that when I want to launch Pages I hit Command-Space, PG, Return and it’s up and running.

Since it can also use what I type to search my address book I can find a person by typing part of their name, then hit the right arrow button and select and e-mail address, press Return and I’ve got a new mail message addressed to that person and ready for writing.

I use Skype for my phone calls and have installed some LaunchBar scripts to control it, allowing me to just navigate to a person’s phone number through LaunchBar and hit Return; Skype dials them for me.

Though I can get by with Spotlight on a Mac that doesn’t have LaunchBar installed, my productivity takes a bit of a dip. LaunchBar is €24.00 for a single user version and €39.00 for a 5 user family license.

Spaces
I run lots of applications at the same time (right now I’ve got 16 running). Even with dual screens I like being able to arrange my application windows in a very structured way so I always know where to look for things. Spaces give me the ability to set up those work spaces and jump between them very quickly. The alternative is a bunch of windows that are either layered on top of one another or minimized down to the Dock Bar. I have found that jumping to a Space that contains the apps I need set up and ready for use saves me a lot of time throughout the day.

I’ve written quite a bit on how I’ve set up Spaces to optimize my daily routine. Though it’s included in OS X and could really just be considered a part of the Mac experience I’ve observed a number of Mac users that never bother to. If you haven’t already, give Spaces a try.

SteerMouse
Though I’m a keyboard first kind of person there are plenty of times that I switch into “mouse mode”. Usually this is when I’m browsing through information on a combination of web pages, links from Twitter, and from NetNewsWire. This is when I want my mouse to be more than just a 2 button hockey puck with a scroll wheel and go for heavier duty mice that have multiple programmable buttons.

Logitech is my mouse vendor of choice and while I love the hardware they produce the Mac mouse drivers they put out have been horrid. Fortunately SteerMouse has come to my rescue. It allows me to define custom actions on all of the buttons on my Logitech Mx510 mouse. While I would prefer that Logitech make serious efforts to improve their drivers I’ll happily pay the $20 for SteerMouse because it makes my mouse that much more functional.

So there you have it, the four applications I use constantly to optimize the way I use my Mac. How about you? Got an application that helps you perform at your peak? Drop a note in the comments and share.

Visit DavidAlison.com

Categories
Parallel Desktops

TweetDeck vs Nambu vs Tweetie

I’ve become quite attached to Twitter lately, as several of my blog posts will attest. I use it for a wide range of things; a source of news (technical and non-technical), to chat with friends and share things I find of interest, to ask and answer questions on Macs, Ruby on Rails, etc. and finally to banter about my favorite sports teams (Redskins and Caps, thank you very much).

Given this wide range of uses I tend to be accessing my Twitter feeds throughout the day and the web interface simply doesn’t handle things the way I need it to. As a result I use a custom client to access Twitter. A custom client presents Tweets in their own interface, accessing the data through the Twitter API. You drop in your Twitter username and password and the custom client takes over from there, presenting you with a view of your Tweets and the ability to create them as well.

Over the last few months I’ve tried a number of different Twitter clients for my Mac. First it was TweetDeck, an Adobe Air based client that does a great job of breaking Tweets up into separate and configurable panels. Next I tried Nambu, a native Mac OS X application that showed some real promise. Nambu leveraged many of the same UI elements that TweetDeck did, but it was packaged into a much more Mac style application. Finally Tweetie was released for Mac recently. A popular iPhone Twitter client, Tweetie has a graceful interface that puts a different look and feel on Twitter than TweetDeck and Nambu do. Each of these applications has strengths and weaknesses, which I will try to identify below.

TweetDeck

Strengths: Multiple panels that can be customized and filtered. Ability to create a search panel that persists between sessions. Can auto-complete user names when composing Tweets and addressing to people. Group support. Can also update FaceBook status.

Weaknesses: Uses a lot of memory. User Interface looks odd next to other Mac applications. Can leak memory (though that is reportedly fixed). Font size cannot be set and panels cannot be resized; you only have two sizes for panels. Only supports a single Twitter account.

Summary: TweetDeck is great for people that follow a large number of folks and want to break up their Tweets into custom groups. If you can get over the fact that TweetDeck does not look like a native OS X application it’s a nice Twitter client and is used by an extremely large number of people. It includes lots of little niceties to make creating, replying and ReTweeting posts very simple.

I like that I can click on a person in a list and quickly see their profile and that each Tweet contains virtually all of the information available. Want to know what a Tweet is in reply to? Click the “…in reply to…” text on a Tweet and it loads up the original Tweet in your web browser.

The reason I started looking around at other clients after I had been using TweetDeck for so long was the fact that I wanted something that actually looked like a Mac application. That and the memory leaks in TweetDeck meant you couldn’t leave it running for days at a time without it continually chewing into your memory pool. Even with these issues it is a very capable Twitter client.

Nambu

Strengths: Native Mac application. Has three different view styles including the panel view that TweetDeck uses. Auto-complete for user names when writing a Tweet. Remembers any panel or search you create so that it can be called up later. Ability to create groups of users. Multiple account support.

Weaknesses: In beta and it shows; memory is burned up quickly and Nambu requires restarts fairly often (daily). The pop-up menus within a Tweet and user profiles can take a very long time to display. Not all of the details on a Tweet (like what it is in reply to) are available.

Summary: I like that Nambu gives me so many viewing options, allowing me to tailor it to meet my needs—and screen real estate demands—very well. The fact that I can control (to a degree) the size of the font means I can squish a lot more Tweets into a single page with Nambu than I can with TweetDeck. It also does something that TweetDeck does not do right now: update the Dock Bar image with the number of unread Tweets.

It’s pretty clear that Nambu will strive to be a one-stop social networking application. Though it is disabled in the current beta there are placeholders for FriendFeed, Identi.ca and Ping.fm. If your goal is to keep everything on the social side in one place then Nambu may have an answer for that in the long run.

Nambu is still a relatively young application and it shows in performance and stability. Once Nambu matures a bit, the memory leaks are fixed and the menu performance improves it will be a strong contender to virtually any of the tasks people use TweetDeck for now.

Tweetie

Strengths: Native Mac application. Extremely stable and quick, very resource efficient. User interface is very powerful, especially for navigating across “conversations”. Keyboard friendly for nearly all navigation and input. Tear off search windows provide great flexibility. Multiple account support.

Weaknesses: Doesn’t provide user name auto-complete. No support for Groups. Keyboard navigation within Direct Messages is quirky.

Summary: Tweetie for Mac is a completely different take on dealing with Twitter than either TweetDeck or Nambu. The level of polish and finish on Tweetie is immediately apparent and the smooth UI transitions and keyboard shortcuts make it easy to become comfortable quickly.

The inability to place people you follow into a group so that you can more quickly pick out their Tweets is a shortcoming, as is the fact that searches are not saved across sessions. The keyboard shortcuts simply stop working when you are in the Direct Message area and have replied to a message.

By far the most powerful part of Tweetie is the ability to navigate your way through conversations. If you see someone you follow respond to a person that you don’t follow you can quickly jump to that string of Tweets. It makes reading Twitter feeds much more conversation friendly. Not only can you jump in but Tweetie maintains the context you are coming from so you can navigate your way back out to where you started.

Which one is best for you?
From a functionality standpoint TweetDeck and Nambu are on pretty equal footing. If you follow a large number of people that generate a lot of Tweets, you will appreciate the ability to break your key followers up into groups that you can monitor more easily. I’ve had people follow me on Twitter that have thousands—sometimes tens of thousands—of people THEY follow. Clearly no one can even use a Twitter timeline that contains that much traffic so that grouping and filtering feature both TweetDeck and Nambu have would be critical.

I’m hoping that once Nambu comes out of beta it’s performance will pick up and the memory leaks will be eliminated. Until then TweetDeck is a lot more stable, though if you have multiple Twitter accounts Nambu is the better option.

If you don’t follow a huge number of people and can get by without the group functionality then Tweetie is an outstanding Twitter client. The user interface is simply fantastic, looking and feeling like a native Mac application. It is currently available for $14.95 through May 4 ($19.95 after that). I am personally using Tweetie now; the other features have made me forget about the lack of groups and I don’t really follow that many people.

The competition for Twitter clients is great for all of us. As the software developers keep innovating we will continue to get some really interesting options when it comes to working with Twitter. Keep in mind that this review of these applications was based on the state of them on April 27, 2009. Both TweetDeck and Nambu are listed as being in Beta. Updates can come quickly.

I’ve done some previous blog posts on both TweetDeck and Nambu that have more detailed information. If you want to learn more about Tweetie I highly recommend that you watch Don McAllister’s excellent video tutorial on it.

Got a Twitter client you really like? Drop a note about it in the comments and share what you like and don’t like about it.

Visit DavidAlison.com