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Digital Lifestyles Photography

Photographing Live Concerts

I have a spent a great deal of my life attending hundreds of of concerts and I regret not photographing each and every one of them. The reason being Baby Boomers are revisiting their youth collecting photographs of their favorite Rock Stars while many say they have a whole room or wall collection of Rock n Roll images .

Many of the images from my "So you Want to be a Rock n Roll Star" collection were shot live at the legendary Armadillo World Headquarters in Austin. Others were taken at concerts around the country while I was on assignment for either the artist or record company, or for my own personal collection. In most cases, I have been lucky enough to be able to photograph some of my favorite musicians. Legendary artists like The Grateful Dead, The Byrds, Kinks, Van Morrison, Willie Nelson, Emmylou Harris, Leon Russell and the Who.

The keys to shooting a live performance are: the right location, the right equipment and patience. Securing the prime spot, whether on stage or right up front close to the stage requires planning and a well trained eye. I usually arrange for a Press and Backstage Pass, but I also make sure I’m in the front row with the audience during at least some of the performance.

A lot of thought goes behind the equipment choices. At the very least, plan on either two fast prime lenses, like a 50 1.4 and a 135 F2, or a fast medium telephoto zoom such as a 28-105 2.8 or a little longer 70-200 2.8 .

Shooting concerts with todays digital professional SLRs such as a Nikon D3 or a similar Canon etc. is really nice as there is very little noise at ISO 1600 and higher.

If you visit my website, Vanredin.com, I have posted some of my collection. The older Black and White images were shot on Tri-X pushed to ASA 1600 and processed in Diafine developer. Older color images were shot on Ektachrome 400 and if needed, pushed 1 or 2 stops. These images were then scanned, cleaned up and in some cases enhanced using Adobe Photoshop.

Van Redin’s Rock ‘n Roll prints are for sale.
Prints sizes are available from 8×10" to 16×20" and larger on some images.
Canvas prints stretched on a frame are very popular also.
See all the images at VanRedin.com . Leave a comment or contact the author through his website for more information.

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Books Digital Lifestyles Photography Reviews Software

Complete Guide To The Nikon D300 By Thom Hogan

On User Manuals, Digital Books, Travel, The Importance of eBooks and The Foresight of Thom Hogan

I like physical books.  By that I mean I like a book I can hold in my hand, feel the texture, and maybe even revel in the smell of the paper and the ink.  I like to consume well-done images that inspire or instruct.  I like books that open themselves flat and allow me to look at them without having to hold down both sides of the tight binding of a signature in the book without being afraid that the book would snap closed if I turned lose with one or both hands.

But then I have to say that there is a “but” that goes with all of that.  The bigger a book gets the less likely I am to have it along when I want it.  Big books in heavy bindings don’t fit easily into the weight requirements of modern-day air travel.  They’re, well, “big” and “big” and “ease of travel” are oxymorons.  They just don’t work interchangeably.

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Digital Lifestyles Photography Workflow

The Nikon D300 Camera at Work

My job as a Still Photographer in the motion picture industry requires me to get the best possible images for publicity purposes. This requires me to constantly update my equipment when new and better technology is developed.

Such is the case with the Nikon D300 camera which hit the market in Dec 2007 and is now available without the waiting list that it had for several months. I had been using the Nikon D2x and the Nikon D200 cameras for several years, and a Nikon D100 and D1x prior to that.